International Society of Olympic Historians

May 13, 2008 by

The ISOH has recently started a blog:

http://blog.isoh.org/

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Journalists at the Beijing 2008 Olympics

March 26, 2008 by
In an attempt to start assembling journalists that will be in Beijing, I’ve put together a Facebook group to share impressions, understanding and knowledge about orientation. If you’re going and you’re covering the Games as a journalist, please join the group:

 http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=10776325266&ref=mf

Andy Miah
email@andymiah.net

Beijing 2008 Torch Relay Route

March 24, 2008 by

Having just watched the lighting ceremony in Olympia, I wanted to find a brief indication of the route, in part to become more familiar with regions of China, but also to record details of the coverage. It’s also one of the most remarkable cultural events of the Olympic programme.

Date Arrival
Mar-24 Lighting Ceremony at Olympia – Reporters without Frontiers protest in stadium and Tibet protestors in Olympia
March 24–29 Torch Relay in Greece
Mar-30 Greece Hand-over Ceremony
Mar-31 Beijing
Apr-01 Heading to Almaty
Apr-02 Almaty
Apr-03 Istanbul
Apr-05 St. Petersburg
Apr-06 London
Apr-07 Paris
Apr-09 San Francisco
Apr-11 Buenos Aires
Apr-13 Dar es Salaam
Apr-14 Muscat
Apr-16 Islamabad
Apr-17 New Delhi
Apr-19 Bangkok
Apr-21 Kuala Lumpur
Apr-22 Jakarta
Apr-24 Canberra
Apr-26 Nagano
Apr-27 Seoul
Apr-28 Pyongyang
Apr-29 Ho Chi Minh City
May-02 Hong Kong
May-03 Macao
Hainan
May-04 Sanya
May-05 Wuzhishan
May-05 Wanning
May-06 Haikou
Guangdong
May-07 Guangzhou
May-08 Shenzhen
May-09 Huizhou
May-10 Shantou
Fujian
May-11 Fuzhou
May-12 Quanzhou
May-12 Xiamen
May-13 Longyan
Jiangxi
May-14 Ruijin
May-15 Jinggangshan
May-16 Nanchang
Zhejiang
May-17 Wenzhou
May-17 Shaoxing
May-18 Hangzhou
May-19 Ningbo
May-19 Jiaxing
May 20-21 Shanghai
Jiangsu
May-22 Suzhou
May-22 Nantong
May-23 Taizhou
May-23 Yangzhou
May-24 Nanjing
Anhui
May-25 Hefei
May-27 Huainan
May-27 Wuhu
May-28 Jixi
May-28 Huangshan
Hubei
May-29 Wuhan
May-30 Yichang
May-31 Jingzhou
Hunan
Jun-01 Yueyang
Jun-02 Changsha
Jun-03 Shaoshan
Guangxi
Jun-04 Guilin
Jun-05 Nanning
Jun-06 Baise
Yunnan
Jun-07 Kunming
Jun-08 Lijing
Jun-09 Xamgyi’nyilha
Guizhou
Jun-10 Guiyang
Jun-11 Kaili
Jun-12 Zunyi
June 13-14 Chongqing
Sichuan
Jun-15 Guang’an
Jun-15 Mianyang
Jun-16 Guanghan
Jun-16 Leshan
Jun-17 Zigong
Jun-17 Yibin
Jun-18 Chengdu
Tibet
Jun-19 Shannan Diqu
June 20-21 Lhasa
Qinghai
Jun-22 Golmud
Jun-23 Qinghai Hu
Jun-24 Xining
Xinjiang
Jun-25 Urumqi
Jun-26 Kashi
Jun-27 Shihezi
Jun-27 Changji
Gansu
May-28 Dunhuang
Jun-28 Jiangyuguan
Jun-29 Jiuquan
Jun-30 Tianshui
Jun-30 Lanzhou
Ningxia
Jul-02 Zhongwei
Jul-03 Wuzhong
Jul-04 Yinchuan
Shannxi
Jul-05 Yan’an
Jul-06 Yangling
Jul-06 Xianyang
Jul-07 Xi’an
Shanxi
Jul-08 Yuncheng
Jul-08 Pingyao
Jul-09 Taiyuan
Jul-10 Datong
Inner Mongolia
Jul-11 Hohhot
Jul-12 Ordos
Jul-12 Baotou
Jul-13 Chifeng
Heilongjiang
Jul-14 Qiqihar
Jul-15 Daqing
Jul-16 Harbin
Jilin
Jul-17 Songyuan
Jul-17 Changchun
Jul-18 Jilin
Jul-19 Yanji
Liaoning
Jul-20 Shenyang
Jul-21 Benxi
Jul-21 Liaoyang
Jul-21 Anshan
Jul-22 Dalian
Shandong
Jul-23 Yantai
Jul-23 Weihai
Jul-24 Qingdao
Jul-24 Rizhao
Jul-25 Linyi
Jul-25 Qufu
Jul-25 Taian
Jul-26 Jinan
Henan
Jul-28 Shangqiu
Jul-28 Kaifeng
Jul-29 Zhengzhou
Jul-30 Luoyang
Jul-31 Anyang
Hebei
Aug-01 Shijiazhuang
Aug-02 Qinhuangdao
Aug-03 Tangshan
August 4-5 Tianjin
August 6-8 Beijing

Olympic Legacies (29-30 March, 2008, Oxford)

March 11, 2008 by

Olympic Legacies
29-30 March 2008
St Antony’s College, Oxford
South Asian Studies Programme
Asian Studies Centre, St Antony’s College, Oxford
St Antony’s College, Oxford, OX2 6JF, UK · Tel: (01865) 274559 ·
Fax: (01865) 274559, Email: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk
Hosts: St Antony’s College, Oxford, La Trobe University, Melbourne and Taylor & Francis Group.

DAY 1

8.30-9.15 am: Breakfast at St John’s College

9.45-10.30 am: Registration at St Antony’s College

10.30-10.40 am: Inaugural comments – David Washbrook (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

10.40-10.50 am: J.A. Mangan (Founding and Executive Academic Editor, ‘International Journal of the History of Sport’)

IJHS-25 plus

10.50-11.00 am: Jonathan Manley (Publisher, Taylor and Francis Sports Journals) – The Evolution of Information and Communication in Sport Studies

11.00 am-12.00 pm: First Keynote Address – John J. MacAloon (University of Chicago) – ‘Legacy’ and the Dilemma of the Olympic Movement

Discussant: Brian Stoddart (La Trobe University, Melbourne)

12.00-12.15 pm: Coffee Break

12.15-1.30 pm: Panel 1 – Olympic Legacies: Overview

Bruce Kidd (University of Toronto) – The Ideological Legacies of the Olympic Games

Hans M. Westerbeek (La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia) – Amsterdam 1928 – Amsterdam 2028: On past and future legacies

Jean-Loup Chappelet, (Swiss Graduate School of Public Administration (IDHEAP), Lausanne) – Olympic Environmental  Concerns as a Legacy of the Winter Games
Discussant: David Washbrook (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

1.30-2.30 pm: Lunch

2.30-3.45 pm: Panel 2 – Olympic Legacies Overview

John Hughson (University of Central Lancashire) – The Legacy of Olympic Game’s Films: The Case of Melbourne 1956

Joseph Maguire (Loughborough University) – Branding and Consumption in the IOCs ‘Celebrate Humanity’ Advertisements: Hidden Messages

Mark Dyreson, and Matthew Llewellyn (Penn State University) – The Olympic Legacy of Los Angeles

Discussant: Bruce Kidd (University of Toronto)

3.45-4.00 pm: Tea break

4.00-5.15 pm: Panel 3 – Far Eastern Olympic Issues

Dong Jinxia (Peking University) and J.A. Mangan (Founding and Executive Academic Editor, ‘International Journal of the History of Sport’) – Beijing Olympics Legacies:  Certain Intentions and Certain  and Uncertain Outcomes

Dolores Martinez (School of Oriental and African Studies) – The Legacy of the 1964 Tokyo Olympiad

Brian Bridges (Lingnan University, Hong Kong) – The Seoul Olympics: Economic Miracle Meets the World

Discussant: John MacAloon (University of Chicago)

6.30-7.00 pm: T&F Reception and Release of Ceremonial First Day Cover specially designed for the conference by Terry Mitchell of Chapman and Mitchell Covers.

7.00 pm: Conference Dinner
DAY 2

8.30-9.15 am: Breakfast at St John’s College

10.00-10.15 am: Tea and Coffee

10.15 am-12.00 pm: Panel 4 – South Asian Olympic and (Imperial) Issues

Ronojoy Sen (Associate Editor, Times of India) – Playing Under Empire: Indian Sportspersons and Questions of Identity in Colonial India
Boria Majumdar (La Trobe University, Melbourne) – Games of Self-Respect: A Colony at the Olympics
Nalin Mehta (Deputy News Editor, Times Now Television, India) – The Golden Legacy: Hockey and India’s Olympic Encounter

Kausik Bandyopadhyay (Maulana Azad Institute of Advanced Studies, Kolkata) – Uncovering the Sleeping Giant Syndrome: India in Olympic Football

Discussant: J. A. Mangan (Founding and Executive Academic Editor, ‘International Journal of the History of Sport’)

12.00-12.15 pm: Tea Break

12.15-1.15 pm: Panel 5 – Western Olympic Issues

Gavin Poynter (University of East London) – London 2012: The Regeneration Game(s)

Charles Davis – Searching for the Greatest Olympic Performances, Using a Complete Summer Olympics Database

Discussant: Mark Dyreson (Penn State University)

1.15-2.30 pm: Lunch

2.30-3.30 pm: 2nd Keynote Address – Malcolm Speed (Chief Executive, International Cricket Council) – Cricket and the Olympics: A potential legacy

3.30-3.45 pm: Tea Break

3.45-4.45 pm: Final Keynote Address – Brian Stoddart (Former Vice Chancellor, La Trobe University, Melbourne) – The Olympic Movement and Geopolitical Legacies.
4.45-5.15 pm: Concluding Session
4.45-5.00 pm: David Washbrook (St Antony’s College, Oxford) – Summing up
5.00-5.15 pm: Hans Westerbeek (La Trobe University, Melbourne) – Closing Remarks and Vote of Thanks

Owning the Olympics (new publication)

March 5, 2008 by

New book with my following paper:

Miah, A., B. Garcia, et al. (2008). ‘We are the Media’: Non-Accredited Media & Citizen Journalists at the Olympic Gams. Owning the Olympics: Narratives of the New China. M. E. Price and D. Dayan. Michigan, University of Michigan Press: 320-345.

Owning the Olympics
Narratives of the New China

Monroe E. Price and Daniel Dayan, Editors


About the Book

“A major contribution to the study of global events in times of global media. Owning the Olympics tests the possibilities and limits of the concept of ‘media events’ by analyzing the mega-event of the information age: the Beijing Olympics. . . . A good read from cover to cover.”
—Guobin Yang, Associate Professor, Asian/Middle Eastern Cultures & Sociology, Barnard College, Columbia University

From the moment they were announced, the Beijing Games were a major media event and the focus of intense scrutiny and speculation. In contrast to earlier such events, however, the Beijing Games are also unfolding in a newly volatile global media environment that is no longer monopolized by broadcast media. The dramatic expansion of media outlets and the growth of mobile communications technology have changed the nature of media events, making it significantly more difficult to regulate them or control their meaning. This volatility is reflected in the multiple, well-publicized controversies characterizing the run-up to Beijing 2008. According to many Western commentators, the People’s Republic of China seized the Olympics as an opportunity to reinvent itself as the “New China”—a global leader in economics, technology, and environmental issues, with an improving human-rights record. But China’s maneuverings have also been hotly contested by diverse global voices, including prominent human-rights advocates, all seeking to displace the official story of the Games.

Bringing together a distinguished group of scholars from Chinese studies, human rights, media studies, law, and other fields, Owning the Olympics reveals how multiple entities—including the Chinese Communist Party itself—seek to influence and control the narratives through which the Beijing Games will be understood.

http://www.press.umich.edu/titleDetailDesc.do?id=308803

SYNTHETIC TIMES – Media Art China 2008 (Beijing, June-July)

March 4, 2008 by
http://www.mediartchina.org/introduction

National Art Museum of China (NAMOC)
No. 1 Wusi Street Dongcheng District
Beijing 100010 P.R.China

Jun 10, 2008 -July 3, 2008

During the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, the National Art Museum of China will present “SYNTHETIC TIMES – Media Art China 2008” in its current location at the center of Beijing. NAMOC is the only national art museum in China that is dedicated to research, presentation and promotion of modern and contemporary arts. “SYNTHETIC TIMES – Media Art China 2008”, scheduled from June 10th to July 3rd, will be one of the most important cultural events leading up to the Olympic Games in Beijing.

The exhibition will occupy approximately 4500 square meters (48000 square feet) of the museum gallery space and an additional outdoor area of ca. 2000 square meters (32000 square feet). The internationally recognized Dutch architecture firm NOX/Lars Spuybroek will architecturally transform the entire first floor of the museum in response to the nature of the works on display. A full-color catalogue will be co-published by NAMOC and the MIT Press to accompany the opening (with international distribution). An online forum dedicated to the discourse of the respective exhibition themes and beyond will be created prior to the opening of the event. A pre-Exhibition symposium will be held in New York City in collaboration with MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) and other major cultural and educational institutions. The forum and the subsequent symposia will be moderated by a group of distinguished scholars and media arts professionals. Selected discussion essays will be included in the catalogue. Meanwhile, a number of satellite exhibition venues have been planed within the greater Beijing art community, engaging prominent galleries of the booming Beijing art scene. In addition, a number of special evening events during the opening days of the Exhibition are conceived to celebrate countries with significant contribution to the development of media art and culture.

Synthetic Times – Media Art China 2008 will showcase both established and emerging artists from approximately thirty countries, and over fifty media art installation works will be on view along with performances, workshops, presentations and discussion panels. To complement the theme exhibitions, The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) will contribute a special screening program consisting of seminal video art works. Ars Electronica is set to present the award winning Animation Festival while European Media Art Festival will bring in an edition of International Emerging Video Art. The Exhibition is envisaged as a landmark event in the history of contemporary Chinese art dedicated to embracing the most innovative artistic production and theorization to date, and aspiring to foster and advance new modes of thinking and novel ways of artistic engagement in an increasingly technologically immersed society and global cultural landscape, resonating with the leitmotifs of “Cultural Olympics” and “Hi-Tech Olympics” put forward by the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

Supported by the Chinese government, international cultural foundations as well as embassies from the participating countries, renowned museums and media art institutions worldwide will collaborate with NAMOC to produce the Exhibition and its related events.

Media Art China is conceived as a brand name, which will take on the form of either Biennale or Triennial in the future.

IOC Blogging Guidelines

March 3, 2008 by

A week or so back the IOC launched their guidelines for blogging at the Beijing 2008 Games. The guidelines apply to ‘Accredited People’ and are directed principally towards athletes. In 2004, there were no guidelines for such practices, so these are a welcome articulation of the legal position athlets are in during Beijing.

Tomorrow, I’ll speak to Australia’s ABC radio about this subject, as there have been a number of incidents of interest that are particular to the Beijing Games, notably the prospect of its being utilized for political campaigning. While athletes are bound by the Olympic Charter to remain silent about their views during Games time or risk expulsion, it seems unlikely that this will transpire. Already, a number of athletes are converging around the Team Darfur initiative and the British Olympic Association has retreated on its modified contract for athletes.

Social Science Perspectives on the 2012 London Olympic Games (14 March, 2008)

February 26, 2008 by

Social Science Perspectives on the 2012 London Olympic Games

An Academy of Social Sciences Seminar supported by the ESRC as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science and organised in cooperation with the University of East London.

British Library, Euston Road, London, NW1
14 March 2008
16:30 – 19:00
£10 to include drinks and refreshments

The economic and social impact of the London 2012 Olympics Games is the focus of this debate. It will explore the significance in contexts of symbolic meanings of sport, competition between cities, international tourism, emergence of new hybrid global organizations and how the London Olympics highlights urban regeneration and cultural diversity.

Chaired by Mike Rustin, speakers include:
Iain MacRury (Gifts and Markets),
Maurice Roche (Mega-events)
John Urry (Global Tourism)

Registration is essential.

For more information on registration, please contact the AcSS office.

AcSS
30 Tabernacle Street
London
EC2A 4UE

Tel: 020 7330 0897

administrator@acss.org.uk

http://www.acss.org.uk <http://www.acss.org.uk/&gt;

Speakers

Maurice Roche

‘Putting the London 2012 Olympics into perspective: The challenge of understanding Mega-events’

The London 2012 Olympics is a complex and multi-dimensional event. Nevertheless academic, policy-making and public discussions are likely to be dominated by changing assessments of the balance between its costs and its benefits, assessments which are likely to be informed by versions of an economic perspective. This brief presentation suggests that the future research and inquiry into this event needs to go beyond the economic. It needs wider perspectives, which would aim to recognise, in addition, the event’s political, cultural and media dimensions.  With this in mind the field of the sociology of mega-events is discussed, in particular the analysis given in ‘Mega-Events and Modernity’ (Maurice Roche, 2000, Routledge). Based on this it is suggested that a perspective on and  study of the 2012 Olympics as a media event would be particularly interesting and relevant.

Maurice Roche is Reader in Sociology at Sheffield University. He was Director of Sheffield University’s interdisciplinary research centre on European Social and Cultural Studies (ESCUS) 2003-6. Since the 1980s his research interests have been concerned with the sociology of popular culture and cultural policy, particularly focusing on major sport and cultural events, and  with the sociology of citizenship and European society. He is author of Mega-Events and Modernity: Olympics and Expos in the Growth of Global Culture 2000, Routledge;  and  Sport, Identity and Popular Culture 1998, editor, Meyer & Meyer Verlag, among many other works.

John Urry

The Olympic Games and Contemporary Tourism

John Urry will consider  some of the connections between the Olympic Games and contemporary tourism. He will argue that the Olympic movement is now a tourism movement and has little to do with individual sporting success or achievement. The competition is now about landing the Games and then delivering the Games so as to move that city closer to the centres of global power and status.

John Urry is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Lancaster University. He is a member of the Council, Academy of Social Sciences and a former RAE Panel Chair. He is author of many books including The Tourist Gaze (1990/2002), Economies of Signs and Space (1994), Consuming Places (1995), Sociology Beyond Societies (2000), Performing Tourist Places (2004), Mobilities (2007).

Iain MacRury

Gift or Commodity?   Competing Conceptions of the 2012 Olympics

Iain MacRury will  examine competing conceptions of the London 2012 Olympics: as ‘gift’ and as ‘commodity’. He will argue  that for aspirations connected to improved social and cultural engagement, legacy and the sustainable regeneration of East London to materialise, it is important that governance and delivery of the Games sufficiently integrates two orientations: one to cost benefit input-out economism; the other, to a raft of progressive and developmental cultural values surrounding this mega event.

Iain MacRury is Director of the London East Research Institute and
the co-editor, with Prof. Gavin Poynter, of  Olympic Cities: 2012 and the Remaking of East London (Ashgate 2008, forthcoming) and co-author of A Lasting Legacy for London, a report for the London Assembly on prospects for a good Olympic legacy for London.

The Seminar will be chaired by Michael Rustin, Professor of Sociology at the University of East London, co-editor with Phil Cohen of London’s Turning: the Making of Thames Gateway. Ashgate March 2008.

An Academy of Social Sciences Seminar supported by the ESRC as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science and organised in cooperation with the University of East London.

British Library, Euston Road, London, NW1
14 March 2008
16:30 – 19:00
£10 to include drinks and refreshments

The economic and social impact of the London 2012 Olympics Games is the focus of this debate. It will explore the significance in contexts of symbolic meanings of sport, competition between cities, international tourism, emergence of new hybrid global organizations and how the London Olympics highlights urban regeneration and cultural diversity.

Chaired by Mike Rustin, speakers include:
Iain MacRury (Gifts and Markets),
Maurice Roche (Mega-events)
John Urry (Global Tourism)

Registration is essential.

For more information on registration, please contact the AcSS office.

AcSS
30 Tabernacle Street
London
EC2A 4UE

Tel: 020 7330 0897

administrator@acss.org.uk <mailto:administrator@acss.org.uk>

http://www.acss.org.uk <http://www.acss.org.uk/&gt;

Speakers

Maurice Roche

‘Putting the London 2012 Olympics into perspective: The challenge of understanding Mega-events’

The London 2012 Olympics is a complex and multi-dimensional event. Nevertheless academic, policy-making and public discussions are likely to be dominated by changing assessments of the balance between its costs and its benefits, assessments which are likely to be informed by versions of an economic perspective. This brief presentation suggests that the future research and inquiry into this event needs to go beyond the economic. It needs wider perspectives, which would aim to recognise, in addition, the event’s political, cultural and media dimensions.  With this in mind the field of the sociology of mega-events is discussed, in particular the analysis given in ‘Mega-Events and Modernity’ (Maurice Roche, 2000, Routledge). Based on this it is suggested that a perspective on and  study of the 2012 Olympics as a media event would be particularly interesting and relevant.

Maurice Roche is Reader in Sociology at Sheffield University. He was Director of Sheffield University’s interdisciplinary research centre on European Social and Cultural Studies (ESCUS) 2003-6. Since the 1980s his research interests have been concerned with the sociology of popular culture and cultural policy, particularly focusing on major sport and cultural events, and  with the sociology of citizenship and European society. He is author of Mega-Events and Modernity: Olympics and Expos in the Growth of Global Culture 2000, Routledge;  and  Sport, Identity and Popular Culture 1998, editor, Meyer & Meyer Verlag, among many other works.

John Urry

The Olympic Games and Contemporary Tourism

John Urry will consider  some of the connections between the Olympic Games and contemporary tourism. He will argue that the Olympic movement is now a tourism movement and has little to do with individual sporting success or achievement. The competition is now about landing the Games and then delivering the Games so as to move that city closer to the centres of global power and status.

John Urry is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Lancaster University. He is a member of the Council, Academy of Social Sciences and a former RAE Panel Chair. He is author of many books including The Tourist Gaze (1990/2002), Economies of Signs and Space (1994), Consuming Places (1995), Sociology Beyond Societies (2000), Performing Tourist Places (2004), Mobilities (2007).

Iain MacRury

Gift or Commodity?   Competing Conceptions of the 2012 Olympics

Iain MacRury will  examine competing conceptions of the London 2012 Olympics: as ‘gift’ and as ‘commodity’. He will argue  that for aspirations connected to improved social and cultural engagement, legacy and the sustainable regeneration of East London to materialise, it is important that governance and delivery of the Games sufficiently integrates two orientations: one to cost benefit input-out economism; the other, to a raft of progressive and developmental cultural values surrounding this mega event.

Iain MacRury is Director of the London East Research Institute and
the co-editor, with Prof. Gavin Poynter, of  Olympic Cities: 2012 and the Remaking of East London (Ashgate 2008, forthcoming) and co-author of A Lasting Legacy for London, a report for the London Assembly on prospects for a good Olympic legacy for London.

The Seminar will be chaired by Michael Rustin, Professor of Sociology at the University of East London, co-editor with Phil Cohen of London’s Turning: the Making of Thames Gateway. Ashgate March 2008.

If you have received this e-mail in error, you must treat the information in it (and in any attachment) as strictly CONFIDENTIAL and should delete it immediately. Oxford Brookes University is not responsible for any personal opinion expressed in this e-mail.

The China Beat

January 30, 2008 by

A new blog with contributions from our friend Susan Brownell, writing about the Olympics:

http://thechinabeat.blogspot.com/ 

Prince Charles used in campaign to boycott Beijing Olympics

January 29, 2008 by

An interesting story, but not because Prince Charles is boycotting. Rather, I doubt very much that he was likely to go to the Games at all, so the boycott is entirely a publicity  stunt. All perfectly valid, but it begs the question as to what social significance the term boycott has. Surely, one has to have something at stake for the boycott to be some kind of principled sacrifice.

Free Tibet Campaign urging public figures to stay away

Owen Bowcott
Monday January 28, 2008
Guardian Unlimited

Prince Charles
Prince Charles won’t be going to Beijing in August. Photograph: Stefan Rousseau/PA

The Prince of Wales’ decision not to attend the Beijing Olympics is being used as the launchpad for an international campaign to persuade public figures to boycott the games..