Archive for the ‘Conferences’ Category

Intellectual Muscle

October 15, 2009

great lecture series by Vancouver 2010

Intellectual Muscle

Intellectual Muscle is an eclectic series of talks by prominent and up-and-coming Canadian intellectuals on topics related to the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Public lectures will be delivered at universities across Canada and made available online in podcast form. The online program will include polls, discussion forums and other interactive features, providing Canadians with a unique opportunity to participate in a series of national dialogues.

Intellectual Muscle, developed by Vancouver 2010 and the University of British Columbia, in collaboration with universities across Canada and The Globe and Mail, will run from September 2009 until the end of the Games in March 2010.

globeandmail.com/intellectualmuscle

Podcast schedule:

Date University Speaker Podcast Title
October 8, 2009 University of Toronto Bruce Kidd What Do the Olympics Contribute To Society?
October 10, 2009 University of Saskatchewan Vera Pezer Sport, What Inspires Us and What We’re Missing: Are There Better Ways to Define Success?
October 13, 2009 University of Calgary Simon Hudson The $6 Billion Question: Is it Worth it?
October 15, 2009 University of Victoria Dennis Pilon The Politics of the Olympics
October 20, 2009 The University of British Columbia Judy Illes In Perilous Pursuit of Perfection: The Ethics of Neuroscience in Sport
October 22, 2009 McGill University Margaret Somerville LAUGHING, DREAMING AND SWEATING
The Olympics as a Global “Shared Ethics” Forum
October 27, 2009 Dalhousie University Steven Mannell, Director Making Change Happen:
University Leadership for a Sustainable Future
October 29, 2009 The University of Western Ontario Kevin Wamsley Vancouver: The 6th North American Winter Games: What Does History Tell Us about Hosting the Olympics?
November 3, 2009 To Be Determined To Be Determined To Be Determined
November 5, 2009 To Be Determined To Be Determined To Be Determined
November 10, 2009 University of Northern British Columbia Kathy Lewis A Green Economy and the Value of Rural Places
November 12, 2009 University of New Brunswick Shawn Dalton Environment and Sustainable Development
November 17, 2009 University of Alberta Janice Forsyth The Illusion of Inclusion
November 19, 2009 Wilfrid Laurier University Stephen Wenn Key Issues for a Future Game Plan for the Olympic Movement
November 24, 2009 University of Guelph Matthew Hayday “They Like Us, They Really Like Us!”: Defining Canada through International Accomplishments
November 26, 2009 Simon Fraser University Neil Boyd The Olympic Movement and the Road Ahead: Status Quo or Will the IOC Tackle the Big Issues?
November 30, 2009 Université d’Ottawa Milena Parent Préparer et gérer les Jeux olympiques et paralympiques : le comité organisateur, son leadership et ses parties prenantes
December 1, 2009 Memorial University of Newfoundland LeAnne Petherick A Cultural Celebration of Inclusion? Gender Parody and Athletic Excellence on the Olympic Stage
December 3, 2009 Queen’s University Mary Louise Adams Why Don’t More Men Figure Skate? The Persistence of Gender Stereotypes in Sport
December 7, 2009 Université de Montréal Benoit Melancon French Literature and Language
December 7, 2009 Université du Québec à Montréal Sylvain Lefebvre Les Jeux olympiques d’hiver de Vancouver : Gestion des héritages et durabilité
December 8, 2009 University of Waterloo Whitney Lackenbauer The History of Canada’s Exercise of Sovereignty in the Arctic
December 10, 2009 University of Manitoba David Barber On Thin Ice: Prophetic Ramblings of an Arctic Climate Scientist
December 14, 2009 Université de Montréal Olivier Bauer Le Canadien de Montréal : une religion?
December 14, 2009 Université McGill Antonia Maioni Study of Canada
December 15, 2009 University of Prince Edward Island Joe Velaidum Attaining Spiritual Heights: The Meaning of Life and the Quest for Transparence
January 11, 2009 Université de Montréal Lise Gauvin La marche à pied : Bon pour la santé et la planète!
January 12, 2009 To Be Determined To Be Determined To Be Determined
January 18, 2009 To Be Determined To Be Determined To Be Determined
January 19, 2009 Carleton University James Meadowcroft Political Science
January 25, 2009 To Be Determined To Be Determined To Be Determined
January 26, 2009 University of Waterloo P. Whitney Lackenbauer History
February 1, 2009 Université de Montréal Paul Lewis Management
February 2, 2009 To Be Determined To Be Determined To Be Determined

Olympic Reform: A Ten-Year Review

March 18, 2009

Olympic Reform: A Ten-Year Review

The University of Toronto is proud to host a conference on Olympic Reform: A Ten-Year Review from May 18-20, 2009.  Information about the conference and online registration can be found on our website,
http://www.ac-fpeh.com/Olympic_Reform

Early registration rates are good until April 19.

Accommodations information for our conference, including a  special  $32/person/night rate at the University of Toronto’s New College, can be found online.  The conference has also reserved a limited number of  rooms at the nearby Holiday Inn Toronto Midtown which will be held  until April 18.


Keynote speakers and panelists include

  • Jean-Loup Chappelet, Swiss Graduate School of Public Administration,  University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
  • Giovanni Di Cola, International Labour Organization
  • Andrew Jennings, author of The Great Olympic Swindle, The New Lords of the Rings and Foul! The Secret World of FIFA
  • John MacAloon, University of Chicago
  • Ann Peel, Athletes’ CAN
  • Richard W. Pound, International Olympic Committee
  • Sam Ramsamy, International Olympic Committee

Questions regarding the conference can be directed to Heather Dichter at heather.dichter@utoronto.ca

Social Science Perspectives on the 2012 London Olympic Games (14 March, 2008)

February 26, 2008

Social Science Perspectives on the 2012 London Olympic Games

An Academy of Social Sciences Seminar supported by the ESRC as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science and organised in cooperation with the University of East London.

British Library, Euston Road, London, NW1
14 March 2008
16:30 – 19:00
£10 to include drinks and refreshments

The economic and social impact of the London 2012 Olympics Games is the focus of this debate. It will explore the significance in contexts of symbolic meanings of sport, competition between cities, international tourism, emergence of new hybrid global organizations and how the London Olympics highlights urban regeneration and cultural diversity.

Chaired by Mike Rustin, speakers include:
Iain MacRury (Gifts and Markets),
Maurice Roche (Mega-events)
John Urry (Global Tourism)

Registration is essential.

For more information on registration, please contact the AcSS office.

AcSS
30 Tabernacle Street
London
EC2A 4UE

Tel: 020 7330 0897

administrator@acss.org.uk

http://www.acss.org.uk <http://www.acss.org.uk/&gt;

Speakers

Maurice Roche

‘Putting the London 2012 Olympics into perspective: The challenge of understanding Mega-events’

The London 2012 Olympics is a complex and multi-dimensional event. Nevertheless academic, policy-making and public discussions are likely to be dominated by changing assessments of the balance between its costs and its benefits, assessments which are likely to be informed by versions of an economic perspective. This brief presentation suggests that the future research and inquiry into this event needs to go beyond the economic. It needs wider perspectives, which would aim to recognise, in addition, the event’s political, cultural and media dimensions.  With this in mind the field of the sociology of mega-events is discussed, in particular the analysis given in ‘Mega-Events and Modernity’ (Maurice Roche, 2000, Routledge). Based on this it is suggested that a perspective on and  study of the 2012 Olympics as a media event would be particularly interesting and relevant.

Maurice Roche is Reader in Sociology at Sheffield University. He was Director of Sheffield University’s interdisciplinary research centre on European Social and Cultural Studies (ESCUS) 2003-6. Since the 1980s his research interests have been concerned with the sociology of popular culture and cultural policy, particularly focusing on major sport and cultural events, and  with the sociology of citizenship and European society. He is author of Mega-Events and Modernity: Olympics and Expos in the Growth of Global Culture 2000, Routledge;  and  Sport, Identity and Popular Culture 1998, editor, Meyer & Meyer Verlag, among many other works.

John Urry

The Olympic Games and Contemporary Tourism

John Urry will consider  some of the connections between the Olympic Games and contemporary tourism. He will argue that the Olympic movement is now a tourism movement and has little to do with individual sporting success or achievement. The competition is now about landing the Games and then delivering the Games so as to move that city closer to the centres of global power and status.

John Urry is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Lancaster University. He is a member of the Council, Academy of Social Sciences and a former RAE Panel Chair. He is author of many books including The Tourist Gaze (1990/2002), Economies of Signs and Space (1994), Consuming Places (1995), Sociology Beyond Societies (2000), Performing Tourist Places (2004), Mobilities (2007).

Iain MacRury

Gift or Commodity?   Competing Conceptions of the 2012 Olympics

Iain MacRury will  examine competing conceptions of the London 2012 Olympics: as ‘gift’ and as ‘commodity’. He will argue  that for aspirations connected to improved social and cultural engagement, legacy and the sustainable regeneration of East London to materialise, it is important that governance and delivery of the Games sufficiently integrates two orientations: one to cost benefit input-out economism; the other, to a raft of progressive and developmental cultural values surrounding this mega event.

Iain MacRury is Director of the London East Research Institute and
the co-editor, with Prof. Gavin Poynter, of  Olympic Cities: 2012 and the Remaking of East London (Ashgate 2008, forthcoming) and co-author of A Lasting Legacy for London, a report for the London Assembly on prospects for a good Olympic legacy for London.

The Seminar will be chaired by Michael Rustin, Professor of Sociology at the University of East London, co-editor with Phil Cohen of London’s Turning: the Making of Thames Gateway. Ashgate March 2008.

An Academy of Social Sciences Seminar supported by the ESRC as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science and organised in cooperation with the University of East London.

British Library, Euston Road, London, NW1
14 March 2008
16:30 – 19:00
£10 to include drinks and refreshments

The economic and social impact of the London 2012 Olympics Games is the focus of this debate. It will explore the significance in contexts of symbolic meanings of sport, competition between cities, international tourism, emergence of new hybrid global organizations and how the London Olympics highlights urban regeneration and cultural diversity.

Chaired by Mike Rustin, speakers include:
Iain MacRury (Gifts and Markets),
Maurice Roche (Mega-events)
John Urry (Global Tourism)

Registration is essential.

For more information on registration, please contact the AcSS office.

AcSS
30 Tabernacle Street
London
EC2A 4UE

Tel: 020 7330 0897

administrator@acss.org.uk <mailto:administrator@acss.org.uk>

http://www.acss.org.uk <http://www.acss.org.uk/&gt;

Speakers

Maurice Roche

‘Putting the London 2012 Olympics into perspective: The challenge of understanding Mega-events’

The London 2012 Olympics is a complex and multi-dimensional event. Nevertheless academic, policy-making and public discussions are likely to be dominated by changing assessments of the balance between its costs and its benefits, assessments which are likely to be informed by versions of an economic perspective. This brief presentation suggests that the future research and inquiry into this event needs to go beyond the economic. It needs wider perspectives, which would aim to recognise, in addition, the event’s political, cultural and media dimensions.  With this in mind the field of the sociology of mega-events is discussed, in particular the analysis given in ‘Mega-Events and Modernity’ (Maurice Roche, 2000, Routledge). Based on this it is suggested that a perspective on and  study of the 2012 Olympics as a media event would be particularly interesting and relevant.

Maurice Roche is Reader in Sociology at Sheffield University. He was Director of Sheffield University’s interdisciplinary research centre on European Social and Cultural Studies (ESCUS) 2003-6. Since the 1980s his research interests have been concerned with the sociology of popular culture and cultural policy, particularly focusing on major sport and cultural events, and  with the sociology of citizenship and European society. He is author of Mega-Events and Modernity: Olympics and Expos in the Growth of Global Culture 2000, Routledge;  and  Sport, Identity and Popular Culture 1998, editor, Meyer & Meyer Verlag, among many other works.

John Urry

The Olympic Games and Contemporary Tourism

John Urry will consider  some of the connections between the Olympic Games and contemporary tourism. He will argue that the Olympic movement is now a tourism movement and has little to do with individual sporting success or achievement. The competition is now about landing the Games and then delivering the Games so as to move that city closer to the centres of global power and status.

John Urry is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Lancaster University. He is a member of the Council, Academy of Social Sciences and a former RAE Panel Chair. He is author of many books including The Tourist Gaze (1990/2002), Economies of Signs and Space (1994), Consuming Places (1995), Sociology Beyond Societies (2000), Performing Tourist Places (2004), Mobilities (2007).

Iain MacRury

Gift or Commodity?   Competing Conceptions of the 2012 Olympics

Iain MacRury will  examine competing conceptions of the London 2012 Olympics: as ‘gift’ and as ‘commodity’. He will argue  that for aspirations connected to improved social and cultural engagement, legacy and the sustainable regeneration of East London to materialise, it is important that governance and delivery of the Games sufficiently integrates two orientations: one to cost benefit input-out economism; the other, to a raft of progressive and developmental cultural values surrounding this mega event.

Iain MacRury is Director of the London East Research Institute and
the co-editor, with Prof. Gavin Poynter, of  Olympic Cities: 2012 and the Remaking of East London (Ashgate 2008, forthcoming) and co-author of A Lasting Legacy for London, a report for the London Assembly on prospects for a good Olympic legacy for London.

The Seminar will be chaired by Michael Rustin, Professor of Sociology at the University of East London, co-editor with Phil Cohen of London’s Turning: the Making of Thames Gateway. Ashgate March 2008.

If you have received this e-mail in error, you must treat the information in it (and in any attachment) as strictly CONFIDENTIAL and should delete it immediately. Oxford Brookes University is not responsible for any personal opinion expressed in this e-mail.

The Olympics: Politics and Protest (Leeds, UK, 17-18 July, 2008)

December 4, 2007

The Carnegie Faculty of Sport and Education
at Leeds Metropolitan University invites papers
for the above conference, to be held at
Headingley Carnegie Stadium over 17th and
18th July 2008.

The Olympic Games are probably the most
popular event in the history of sport. The TV
audiences for both the Summer and the
Winter Games now approach saturation point,
the Games generate huge commercial
possibilities for ‘Olympic partners’ and a
deafening cheer goes up in the nominated
country when the venue for the next
tournament but one is revealed. Olympic
history – especially the history dispensed by
the International Olympic Committee itself – is
invariably a history of sporting triumph and
comradeship. The political dimensions of the
Olympic movement have too often been hidden
from its history – hence this conference.
We invite papers that take a critical stance on
the Olympic movement at some point in its
history. These papers may address any of the
following themes:
• de Coubertin and the establishment of the
modern Olympics
• campaigns against the Olympics and/or
specific Olympiads
• gender and the Olympics and the campaign
for gender equity
• racism and the Olympics
• the campaign to establish, and issues
around, the Paralympics
• the amateur-professional divide
• commercialism and the Olympics
• Olympics and the Cold War
• the Olympics as a site of protest
• the Olympics and ‘human rights’
• the Olympics and the environment
• critiques of Olympic ideology and
educational programmes
Needless to say, papers outside of these
specified themes will be considered.
Keynote Speakers:
Professor Helen Lenskyj (University of Toronto)
author of Inside the Olympic Industry (State
University of New York Press, 2000).
John Horne, Reader in the Sociology of Sport,
University of Edinburgh
Please direct outline of your proposed paper (300 words approx.), and any academic enquires,
to conference organiser:
Stephen Wagg
Reader in Sport and Society
Leeds Metropolitan University
Email: s.wagg@leedsmet.ac.uk
CARNEGIE FACULTY OF SPORTY & EDUCATION

LONDON 2012 NEVER TOOK PLACE: Re-imagining the Olympic zone (Stratford, London, 16-17 November 2007)

November 5, 2007

LONDON 2012 NEVER TOOK PLACE: Re-imagining the Olympic zone is a two-day event to mark the launch of WE SELL BOXES, WE BUY GOLD.
This ongoing project explores the 2012 Olympic site and the Lower Lea Valley as a context for interdisciplinary research and artistic intervention. The event takes place at various venues near the Olympic site in Stratford and includes performances by Mark Wayman, a symposium moderated by Iain Sinclair and Nick Couldry and a sound installation by Richard Crow.
The title London 2012 never took place: Re-imagining the Olympic zone is intended as a provocation – a kind of thought experiment. If we could imagine for a moment that the Olympics were not happening, what could the place be like? What is its potential beyond established blueprints? What would result if we re-imagined the site’s future unfolding from the ground up rather then the top down? We aim to keep the question open, bringing the possibility of creative intervention to bear on the ethical and political questions raised by the re-development of the Olympic zone.
Contributions by Katy Andrews, Tim Butler, Julian Cheyne, Bruce Jerram, Simon Niziol, Mike Rustin, Martin Slavin, Julie Sumner and others.
Programme
Friday 16 November 2007

>AN EAST LONDON BORDER – A performance by Mark Wayman

2:00, 3:00 & 4:00pm, The Olympic Park Viewing Gallery

22nd floor, Holden Point, Waddington Road, Stratford, London E15 1QN
Saturday 17 November

>SYMPOSIUM – Moderated by Iain Sinclair and Nick Couldry

3:00-6:00pm, LT300 Lecture Theatre

University of East London, University House, Romford Road, London E15 4LZ
>WE SELL BOXES WE BUY GOLD AUDIO ARCHIVE – 1. BROKEN TRAJECTORIES… – A sound installation by Richard Crow

4:00-9:00pm, The Sports Hall

Sarah Bonnell School, Deanery Road, Stratford, London E15 4LP
All events are free but registration is required as space is limited.

To register please email boxesforgold@yahoo.co.uk or phone 020 7281 8141
Further info: http://boxesforgold.blogspot.com/
WE SELL BOXES, WE BUY GOLD is a collaborative project between curators Lucia Farinati and Louise Garrett,

artists Richard Crow and Alberto Duman and urban researcher/poet Jude Rosen.

Kindly supported by Arts Council England

Creative Clusters (London, UK, 9 Nov, 2007)

October 27, 2007

The Cultural Impact of the Games: The cultural and creative impact of the 2012 Games
8:30am to 7:00pm, DCMS, Cockspur Street
Chaired by Simon Evans, Creative Clusters

A pre-conference seminar held at the Department of Culture, Media and Sport office in London followed by lunch and a coach tour of creative businesses in East London hosted by the 2020 Legacy team at East London Business Association and SPACE Studios. From the outset, culture and education have been seen as a central component of the UK’s Olympic project. This all-day event looks at how this vision is being realised and will include presentations by and discussions with senior DCMS officials and advisors about the current plans for the Cultural Olympiad, and the long-term creative and cultural impact of the Games.

After lunch, at DCMS, the afternoon is spent meeting creative businesses in the East London that are preparing for the Olympics and Paralympics.

The day will finish with a presentation and drinks at SPACE Studios.

 

  The Creative Legacy of the Olympics: The symbolic dimension of the Games as a basis for cultural sustainability
Beatriz Garcia, Director, Impacts 08 – The Liverpool Model, University of Liverpool, UK


  Cultural Impact of the 2012 Games: Culture, the cultural olympiad and the games
Keith Khan, Head of Culture, London 2012, UK


  The 5 Boroughs and the Olympics: Citizenship, the arts and a legacy for the five.
Guy Nicholson, Cabinet Member for Regeneration and the 2012 Olympic Games, London Borough of Hackney, UK


  Creative and Cultural Impact: Of the Sydney 2000 Olympic arts festivals
Craig Hassall, Managing Director, English National Ballet, UK


  Preparing for the Olympics: The Hidden Art experience so far
Dieneke Ferguson, Chief Executive, Mazorca Projects, UK


  The Shoreditch Trust: Even the poor like to have a good time but how…
Michael Pyner, Chief Executive, Shoreditch Trust, UK


  The Whitechapel Gallery: East London’s cultural quarter, and the role of culture in regeneration
Stephen Escritt, Head of Strategic Development, WhiteChapel Art Gallery, UK


  SPACE: A model of culture-led regeneration
Anna Harding, Chief Executive, SPACE, UK

Legacy Lives (30-31 Jan, 2007)

January 9, 2007

The world’s sporting bodies are increasingly focusing upon the legacy of major sporting events and the inaugural Legacy Lives conference will bring many of them together under one roof in London. Presented by pmpLEGACY, and supported by UK Sport, Legacy Lives 2007 will reflect upon best practice legacy planning and implementation for major sporting events around the world.

Dr Beatriz Garcia, Editor of Culture at the Olympics, will be speaking at this event on Social Legacy.